English filmmaker Alex Cox, legendary director of the independent hits Repo Man and Sid and Nancy, will visit the Rafael to present two programs: a screening of his latest, Tombstone Rashomon, and the recent archival restoration of Dennis Hopper’s The Last Movie. Besides his two most celebrated titles, Cox has also created numerous others that have achieved cult status, such as Walker, Straight to Hell, Highway Patrolman and Revengers Tragedy. He is also the author of several books and articles on filmmaking and film genres and proved himself on British television as a lively presenter of the cinema he loves.

TOMBSTONE RASHOMON
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 14 • 7:00

Filmmaker Alex Cox will present and discuss his latest project, a retelling of the fabled Gunfight at the O.K. Corral with a contemporary twist. Establishing the premise that time-traveling filmmakers have landed in 1881 Tombstone one day after the Earp brothers and Doc Holliday faced-off with the Clanton and McLaury brothers, Cox reconstructs the deadly event in the style of Akira Kurosawa’s masterpiece Rashomon, with survivors being interviewed and offering their different (and conflicting) perspectives of the shootout. A cast of largely non-professional actors and slyly crafted special effects bring this low-budget drama to life. Visual Effects: Tippett Studios. Writer/Director: Alex Cox. (US 2017) 83 min. plus discussion.    

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THE LAST MOVIE
THURSDAY, NOV. 15 • 7:00

Alex Cox will present a film he admires, ripe for reevaluation in its recently restored version. Given a sizeable budget after the astounding success of Easy Rider, actor-director Dennis Hopper took cast and crew to a remote Peruvian village and created a fable about the effects of a Hollywood production on the indigenous population. Hopper stars as a stuntman who stays on after the fictional movie has wrapped, and his onscreen ensemble includes Kris Kristofferson, Dean Stockwell, Toni Basil, Russ Tamblyn, Michelle Phillips and Samuel Fuller. Although it garnered a prize at the Venice Film Festival, its consciously experimental style alienated the studio and hurt Hopper’s career. Camera: Laszlo Kovacs. Writer: Stewart Stern. Director: Dennis Hopper. (US 1971) 108 min. plus discussion. 

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The Last Movie is screened in collaboration with Camera Obscura, on the occasion of its opening night. Its Fourth Annual Report runs in Petaluma through November 18.